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Difficult client

I have a client that I am training who has recently had rotator cuff surgery, so she can not do exercises that require her to lift her arms over her head or straight out in front of her; she also has arthritis in her hip. She is 59, not very overweight- just wanting to tone. Does anyone have suggestions on exercises I can do with her that works with both of her upper AND lower body limitations?? Thanks!

Comments for Difficult client

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this might help
by: cell personal trainers

I teach allot of silver sneakers classes. I like to get a small nerf ball and do simple things bicep curls, allot of resistance in the hand like squeezing for 2 min then releasing, for the lower body i use a chair and use simple leg lifts and cycling slowly with sitting down.

Refer to a PT or someone more qualified
by: Anonymous

Refer her to a physical therapist. The fact that you are asking these questions indicates that you are not qualified to train her. Working with her will be a liability to you and risky for her. Anyone who is not in good general health, presents with pain or has orthopedic limitations, refer out.

pain free ROM
by: CJ,A*PT

for someone with Arthritis the Exercise recommendatios: use a minimal load that can be comfortable lifted for at least 2-3 repetitions per set, 1-2 sets 2-3 times per week, increase the rep then load gradually.
-machines are preferred over free weights
-weight should be lifted in a slow and controlled manner, no ballistic movements this is to prevent trauma to the joints.
-perform all exercise in a pain free range of motion, that is the maximum range of mtion that does not elicit pain or discomfort
-perform multi joint exercises to distribute the stress
-instruct and use proper technique, closely surpervise and monitor unitial session
- avoid exercise when symptoms are present.
FOR JOINT PAIN IF BENDING:
-for strength - ISOMETRIC exercise is best.
again avoid exercise when symtoms are present.

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How to fire a client

by Diane
(Illinois)

I recently (4 months ago) started my own in-home personal training business. I'm still working on getting the word out and getting my reputation out there. So, I'm training a lot of friends and friends-of-friends.

Currently, I'm training a man that should be training with me twice a week. He's missed the past 2 weeks and now "totally forgot" about our session tonight.

It's very frustrating and I'm not sure what I am doing wrong and why he is not motivated.
He is training with me because he medically has to. He has a heart condition that will kill him within the year if he doesn't start a fitness program and learn about nutrition.

At each session we discuss nutrition, cooking options, work-outs and more. It's constant working out and education for the full hour.

My struggle is because he is a close friend, HOW do I "fire" him as a client or make it very clear that my time is as important as his time and cancellations just don't work for his goals or mine?

Comments for How to fire a client

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Charge Him
by: Anonymous

You should charge him for sessions that he misses. Eat the losses to date, but let him know that you're trying to run a business and if he misses a scheduled session, you'll have to bill him for your lost time, all or a percentage of the hourly rate.

Its okay to let clients go
by: Machelle Lee The Invisible Gym Mobile Personal Fitness Training

Suggest that he works with someone else that he does not already have a relationship with. Tell him you are concerned that he is not making the necessary changes needed. You feel that you friendship/relationship is a barrier to your client getting the results he needs. You would also prefer to keep your professional life separate from your work life.

Hope this helps!

Machelle

Late cancels
by: Paige

I used to be in agony over this issue all the time! When I start with a client I have them fill out a client info form and waiver. I added a clause into my waiver (in bold)

Twenty-four (24) hours notice is required for all cancellations. Late cancellations and missed appointments will be charged as one session. I respect your time as well, so in the event that I late cancel your session , I will teach you one complimentary lesson.
I _________________ understand, acknowledge and accept Paige's twenty-four cancellation policy. Please initial _______

Everybody that I work with (friends and regular clients) love the policy. This way, neither party has to stress, get upset and all the others nasty feelings we get. Everyone knows where they stand.
Hope this helps! :-)

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