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ISSA Specialist in Martial Arts Conditioning

by Courtney S. Ellis
(San Antonio, Texas USA)

I recently took the Specialist in martial Arts Conditioning and I just passed the exam and the course was well worth the money. I had to sit down and really pay attention to what i was reading, this wasn't hard because the course material in quite interesting. I will continue to get certifications from ISSA. I am pleased with my certifications and I have grown wiser.

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good news and bad news
by: Anonymous

The good news is that you like many others have received a certification paper saying that you have reached some level of expertise in this area.

The bad news is that you can't learn this from a book. You can't learn it from a video either.

If you did this to add value to your overall fitness resume, then congrats. I wish you well.

If you did this because you want to coach martial artists and professional soldiers in the conditioning they will need to fight in life or death situations against opponents of varying backgrounds, then you probably already know that you did not acquire anywhere near what is necessary when a persons life or family is at risk.

A seasoned soldier/fighter would be able to see through this in about 30 seconds. The new guy is the one whose life is being jeopardized here.

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Ummm...not the point...
by: Anonymous

It's "Martial Arts Conditioning" not martial arts training. It's a program designed to maximize the physical and nutritional training regimen to achieve the best performance results in competitive martial arts. They offer an online course in personal training, but you wouldn't argue that reading it in a book will get you a 400lb. bench press. It's information for trainers, not training in the sport.

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I agree
by: Anonymous

It's all about information and knowledge of understanding what's out there. Not making you a so call Pro Fighter Trainer..

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Martial Arts
by: AK111X

As an Extreme Martial Artist with a 1st Dan in Tae Kwon Do and a 1st Kyu in Ninjutsu, as well as being a practitioner of Krav Maga, I can tell u first hand that martial arts and martial art conditioning go straight in hand. U can not be a good martial artist without proper strength, power, and endurance. SMAC is an excellent course but does not work as well for a student with little or no knowledge of martial art technique.
SMAC Works. But there are some things you can't teach or understand without basic martial art knowledge.
AK111X:
Martial Artist
ISSA CFT
ex ROTC Raider CO

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good news and bad news
by: Courtney Ellis

Relax Sir I have combat experience served 22 years Marine Corps, then Army, I just got it so I could apply it to my resume in the fitness environment, nothing in this program has anything to do with fighting; it just a nutrition and fitness certification!

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just another peice of good info!!
by: Courtney Ellis

Oh by the way I am a 4th Dan Chung Do Kwan Taekwondo, 1st Dan Kukkiwon TKD, 3rd Dan Goju Ryu Karate, and I taught some hand to hand in the Marine Corps and Army.

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ISSA, Martial Arts, and the Economy

by Alexander Kervin
(King NC)

Hello! My name is Alexander Kervin. I am an ISSA Certified Personal Trainer, an extreme Martial Artist with a 1st Kyu in Ninjutsu, and an ex ROTC Raider Commander.

As a Raider I got a first hand look at extreme physical fitness. We would workout for a total of 3 hours running with 150lb stretchers, doing pushups, sit-ups, etc, I'm not going to give you the full routine. The hardest workout we did was 45 minutes of straight pushups. If your knees touched the ground or you collapsed from exhaustion you got up and ran a mile. Two friends and I were the only ones who didn't have to run. After a while I became Raider Commander, and for the next two years trained 86 cadets at once, 5 times a week getting ready for competitions. Our first "Raider Meet" was the State Comp. There I earned the title of 4th fittest cadet in the state. Next year I earned the National Record for pushups in ROTC. 136 in 2 minutes. After that I earned the Top Athlete Award.

All the while doing that I was involved in Martial Arts and full contact sparring. I was sore, everyday, and I became a "lean mean, 8 pack ab, fighting machine". So as you can tell, I was "ONE" with physical fitness.

When I graduated I moved to North Carolina with family and got involved with ISSA. Soon I earned my personal trainer certification, as well as 1st Kyu in Ninjutsu. I was elated. For a season I pulled security on the club level for Wake Forrest Football, and then I decided to fulfill my career as an ISSA Trainer.
I was pretty confident, surely with a resume like mine I could get hired right...?
Wrong.

I went on a job finding kraze! Literally, I hit every gym within a 50 mile radius looking to get hired as personal trainer. I submitted at least 100 plus applications, even to the same place over and over, letting them know I was serious. My local YMCA was a real let down. I was bummed.

Soon I got an offer to buy a dojo in town. I was happy. Finally something to do, an accomplishment. Well... that fell through and I was informed I couldn't buy it.
Bummer.

Well it was back to the drawing board. But luckily I have 2 clients, for 15$ an hour. It's not much, but I could not be more happier when I am training someone.

And now for my mini rant.

I am sick and tired of job searching. I am christian and I believe that this is the career field God wants me in. I have been to gyms, and have met and talked with personal trainers. There is one gym (whose name I will not say) they only have one personal trainer who knows what they are doing, only 1 trainer who is a male, and 2 that are under the age of 35. A-lot of trainers I see around my area, are under-qaulified, poorly trained, and are not very fit them selves. (I may sound like I'm just being mean to people, but trust me I'm not). One of the gym's boxing teacher is a 41 year old lady who's overweight. I watched her class and was appalled at the lack of technique she taught her students. Technique that would get you socked in the nose or worse. Not to mention the "Boot Camp" teacher is at least 100 lbs overweight.

It just ticks me off that they would hire people like that over people who know what they are doing.

Alright true story. I went to apply at the ________ and was turned down. A week later they hire some young blond teenage girl, not even out of high school. Understandably furious I asked the manger why they hired her. "O, she plays softball". Was the answer.

I was very angry and replied with "I have 12 years of martial art experience and 4 years of of doing exercises the Army Rangers, and other Spec Ops do. I have State, National, and Regional Records in physical fitness! I am also certified with the ISSA! Is she even certified"?
The manager who was not happy with my outburst replied "No".

So to rap up, I have learned through constant downfall, that a sad part of the Personal Trainer world is full of biased people, under qualified trainers, and the economy is horrible. However, I love my job, I love training people, and will continue to look ahead and keep my hopes up. Perhaps one day I can live my dream out to it's fullest potential.

Work hard and remember "PAIN IS WEAKNESS LEAVING THE BODY"!

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Feel ashamed
by: Anonymous

I wrote my mini rant about martial arts and the economy about 5 yrs ago and looking back on it I'm ashamed at some of the stuff I said. To be blunt, I sound kinda foolish in some aspects, and come off as bragging, even though that wasn't my intention. I also seemed to let my anger get the best of me and because I was so young at the time, and though I had an idea, I wasn't able to see and grasp the situation of the economy and just how bad it was at the time.
Life went on and personal training was simply not a booming business in my town and was hard to get into. I,ve gotten wiser, moved on to other things, and I apologize deeply if I come off sounding like a fool in my mini rant. It was just so disheartening to put my heart and time into achieving something just to get nowhere with it.
But it's all good. I'm still training, still learning, and trying to keep a humble heart. It's funny to look back on the post and think to myself "dude, you sound very foolish". I mean some of the stuff I said was laughable even. Sigh...
My apologies.
Train hard
Fight harder

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